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. instead, the office of the e jimgs president, mohamed morsi, told cnn the egyptian government has no plans to make an announcement tonight. since wednesday of last week militants have fired hundreds of rockets into israel. we're about to bring you one family's harrowing story of dodging the rocket that hit their home today. random attacks like this provoke ferocious air assaults on gaza by the israelis, which also continued today. [ gunfire ] about two hours ago a reuters camera in gaza city caught this explosion. cnn's ben wedeman reports a building near the city was likely hit by an israeli air strike in gaza. he was on live with hala gorani when the explosion happened. take a look. >> i think it's pretty clear that we are moving in the direction of -- [ gunfire ] i can hear shattering glass out there right now. the building just shook of course because i was looking at the camera i didn't see where the blast took place. anybody see it? okay. to the north of this building here. so despite talk of cease fire, hala, it appears that the guns are still firing. >> the gaza ministry of health
with palestinian president mahmoud abbas and she is set to sit down with egyptian president mohamed morsi. >>> no claim of responsibility on that bus explosion yet but word is that hamas has blessed the attacks. we go to ben wedeman for more on that. >> reporter: what we heard from a nearby mosque is an announcement saying that, quote, unquote, lions from the west bank had carried out that attack in tel aviv. there was also the suggestion in that announcement from the mosque that hamas was somehow responsible for that attack. however, the television affiliated with the hamas movement said yes, they did bless that attack but said it was a, quote, unquote, natural reaction to israel's offensive against the gaza strip. so, there has been no claim of responsibility by hamas or by anybody else at this point regarding that attack. now there was some scattered celebratory gunfire in gaza after news of the attack in tel aviv. i'm not aware of anybody handing out candy. it's important to stress that not everybody supports hamas in the gaza strip. and there are many people who are unhappy with the
think they're pretty close right now. i know that the egyptian president, mohamed morsi, very much involved. he's got good relations with hamas, israelis have a relationship, i don't know how good it is, but they have a relationship with the egyptians. there have been israeli envoys that have gone to cairo to meet with high-ranking egyptian officials. trying to broker a deal. no trust, hamas has to trust for the israelis and israelis have no trust for the hamas. there have been a lot of rockets and missiles coming from gaza into israeli and the israeli air strikes pounded away at targets in garz. a lot of casualties. there's no goodwill on the part of either of these, they don't trust each other. having said that, looks like they're close. hamas seems to think within the next hour or two some agreement will be announced, thanks to the egyptians. but i spoke with the israeli government spokesman for the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu in the past hour, he said there's no deal yet. he didn't rule out there wouldn't be a deal but he said there's no deal yet. until all of the
. they are doing it, secretly. >> mohammed morsi's attempt at compromise meeting with the chief judges in cairo, giving verbal assurances that the sweeping powers would only be temporary and limited to unspecified sovereign matters has done nothing to stem unrest. schools and many businesses were closed today due to demonstrations. planned march by muslim brotherhood in support of mohammed morsi was canceled to reduce the chance of conflict between the two sides. >> opposition leaders say there will be no negotiations, no deals made with the president unless he backs down completely and withdraws his decree. otherwise, they say, they will stay out in the street. bret? >> bret: steve harrigan live early wednesday morning in cairo. thank you. palestinian authorities today opened the grave of former leader yasser arafat to take samples from his remains. arafat died in 2004. ostensibly from a stroke. but speculation he was poise -- speculation he was poisoned resurfaced this summer after elevated surface of radioactive substance were detected on his clothing. >>> activists in syria say dozen of peo
, egyptian president mohamed morsi is expected to explain why he granted himself almost absolute authority in a national address later today. anti-morsi protests raged through the night just down the road from where the egyptian assembly agreed on a final constitution. a vote is expected today. holly williams is in cairo. >> reporter: what we're seeing here in egypt is a straight on -- 0 show down between mohamed morsi the country's first democratically elected president and his opponent. morsi is showing no signs of backing down from the expanded new powers that he gave himself last week including immunity from the court. judges from these top courts have gone on strike. meanwhile egypt's supreme constitutional court said it will rule on sunday on whether or not to dissolve the assembly that drafted egypt's new constitution. that assembly is dominated by morsi's allies. they are rushing to finish a final draft. on tahrir square in central cairo some opponents are camped out and say they won't leave until he relinquishes his new powers. president morsi supporters are planning a demonstrati
. mohamed morsi under fire for granting himself extraordinary powers. will that affect cease-fire talks between israel and hamas? they're happening in egypt today. >> and $59 billion! retail records broken as americans crowded stores for some competitive shopping over the weekend. and now cyber monday is here. will shoppers be in even more of a spending mood? >> you want to talk about money? a new powerball jackpot. a new record in the cash payout. it's unreal. >> a packed two hours ahead for you this morning. new jersey congressman bill pascrell will be joining us, grover norquist, jamie rubin, dr. hanan ashrawi, will be our guest, peter billingsley from a christmas story, and grinle college hoops star jack taylor. remember him? big game he had the other day. and the one and only tony bennett, monday, november 26th. welcome, everybody, "starting point" this morning. is that a hint of compromise in the air on capitol hill? 35 days left till we reach the fiscal cliff. and a couple of key republicans are now suggesting that they're willing to forego their no tax pledge to try to get a bud
the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judiciary by banning anyone -- any authority, even the judiciary, from questioning, appealing any decisions he made since june. the question was going into this meeting, would he scale back on some of those d
jewelry. despite backing down on his controversial decrees egypt's president mohamed morsi faced another day of upheaval. huge crowds gathering in tahrir square and police crashed in the streets of cairo, scenes reminiscent of the revolution nearly two years ago. ayman mohyeldin has the latest. is this calming down at all, ayman? he made some concessions so there was a thought, perhaps, from morsi supporters that the protesters would begin to back down. doesn't seem so. >> well, you know, when we've been speaking to the people here in tahrir square and it boils down to an issue of trust. everyone here behind me will tell you they don't trust president mohamed morsi and the muslim brotherhood. they've experienced their rule in parliament and as a president and don't trust the words of the president. that's what we saw last night, president mohamed morsi coming out with a decree or statement following the decree controversial on thursday, came out after meeting with some of the judges saying he was going to use his new powers narrowly. the people think this is an attempt by the president a
is citizens of israel. >> and particularly about egyptian president mohammed morsi. i wanted to play you a brief clip from a campaign rally. in may of this year. this was a rally mohammed morsi was at. i wanted to play for you what it said. >> this was morsi, and was saying that the united states of the arabs will be restored this by this man, the capital will be jerusalem and come on, you lovers of martyrdom. do you trust morsi? >> we focus on deeds rather than words an egypt has filled a constructive role in the past and we hope egypt will continue to fill that role. >> do you think this could if you do have a deal, lead to a real working relationship with the morsi government, or is this something you think is just way too stacked? >> we're always welcoming of an improvement with egypt. we've had a peace treaty for 34 years. that is essential for us, but no less crucial for the egyptians. we all need stability and particularly, egypt now, needs that stability and we have every reason to believe that interest will continue. >> thanks as always for your time. >> thank you. >> we have ne
by egyptian president mohamed morsi, according to state tv. he said that, quote, israeli gra aggression would end on tuesday. that, of course, is today. that's consistent with similar statements we've heard from other officials late last night. we spoke with a senior egyptian official and he told us he's optimistic that in the next 24 hours there would be a cease fire. hamas officials are being even more specific. senior hamas official telling cnn that israel has agreed to the general terms but rejected the timing. hamas conditions, according to an official, are this. stop the air operation, air assaults and want the ground crossings, blockades to be opened up immediately. according to this hamas official israel is saying, okay, we'll stop the air operation but the ground crossings and blockade, we would like to do that gradually. that seems to be the sticking point right now. if you listen to egyptian and hamas officials, some optimism. israeli officials in tel aviv seem to be more cautious when it comes to describing any kind of progress in these talks. >> the rhetoric still coming from egy
's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
to the government in egypt, the president mohamed morsi, that they would stop firing into israel. if that were to be revoked, that would be a violation. they would be breaking their word to the egyptians and that would cause some serious repercussions i assume, christiane, between the egypt government, muslim brotherhood-led government, and hamas. >> reporter: well, i was obviously talking about what's the perspective from this side was. but of course israel's demand was that there would be no more rockets and no more of that fire going into israel. that was something they really wanted. and of course israel does not want to see hamas resupplied through the tunnel network. that is still to be worked out. i asked him whether or not he got weapons and whether hamas was getting weapons from iran, and he gave me a non-confirmation confirmation. it's an open secret that they come through those tunnels. so that has to be taken in hand. we're not sure how that's going to happen, but obviously there is some egyptian role in that as well. but, yes, egypt is the guarantor of this cease-fire. neither sid
's president, mohamed morsi is saying that israel's aggression, as he calls it, against gaza will end in a few hours. our reza sayeh is there. we'll get an update from him this breaking story. we're right on the other side of this break with his report. >>> welcome back. breaking news to get to. we were hearing and we are waiting for a report from reza sayeh, what egypt's president mohamed morsi is now saying. he is saying that id real's aggression, as he calls it, against gaza will end some time today, maybe in a few hours and that egyptian-mediated efforts will produce positive results. reza sayeh is reporting for us on this issue. he joins us live. so, back up and give us some detail. is mohamed morsi really the person who would be able to effectively say that this aggression now ends? >> reporter: well, it's tough to say. what we do know is that it's intelligence officials in egypt that are apparently leading the negotiations and the man who is doing it is mohammed mashat. in 2011 he helped to negotiate the release of israeli soldier, which suggests this egyptian spy chief has pretty stron
? the president mohammed morsi knows that this is happening? >> i will put it this way. the weaponry goes to the red sea from iran. they also come from libya and at certain points, they all cost to egyptian territory. certainly, there is a responsibility to step up to the plate and stop the smuggling. egypt has been constructed from the past. we hope they will continue to fulfill this role now in the future. jenna: i ask that question because we know how important this relationship is for your country and all of ours. i want to talk about "the new york times" article that he wrote about today. it was published and he said that hamas is not interested in peace. they want violence and they want to promote terror. it is not a rational thing according to the way that you laid this out. why negotiate at all through any here in this region? >> they don't want to negotiate at all, they don't want to speak with us. they want to destroy us. they don't actually want to just kill israelis, but jews throughout the world. they are a genocide organization. but they can negotiate with egypt and others w
the egyptian president mohamed morsi and what they call a power grab. we'll take you live to tahrir square. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. tintroducing a revolutionary. this it new mascara.r aleve. clump crusher...crusher. 200% more volume. zero clumps. new clump crusher from easy, breezy, beautiful covergirl. [ male announcer ] can a car be built around a state of mind? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. this is where sophisticated styling begins. and where it ends? that's up to you. it's here -- the greatest malibu ever. ♪ anne's tablet called my phone. anne's tablet was chatting with a tablet in sydney... a desktop in zurich... and a telepresence room in brazil. the secure cloud helped us get some numbers from my assistant's pc in new york. and before i reached the top, the board meeting became a congrats we sold the company party. wait til my wife's
will head to cairo where she'll have face-to-face meetings with egyptian president mohamed morsi. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> want to begin with reza sayah, live for us in cairo. she mentioned in her comments that she is on her way to have meetings with the egyptian president, morsi, at the same time, offering any assistance that israel might need. tell me a little bit about the positioning and navigating she has to do in her meeting with mr. morsi. >> soledad, we can report to you that, according to the u.s. embassy here, secretary clinton has arrived here in cairo and she's going to be meeting with egyptian president mohamed morsi very soon. with the violence escalating, the spotlight, the pressure is on secretary clinton and washington. the u.s. seems to be broadening its role. the key role the u.s. is going to play here is with its sway over israel. obviously, israel and washington are best friends. washington has a lot of influence with israe
with their new president, mohamed morsi who said last week that his decisions cannot be challenged by the courts which gives him almost absolute power. and our holly williams is above tahrir square in cairo this evening. holly, what's going on in the crowd behind you now? >> reporter: scott, we are seeing scenes reminisce september of the egyptian revolution. tahrir square was once again carpeted in people today, tens of thousands of people who poured in from every direction and they were chanting the same slogan that they chanted during the revolution. the people want the downfall of the regime. i was out on this square earlier today talking to people. some people are saying that they won't leave the streets until president morsi rescinds the decrees that have given him sweeping new powers. we've seen very low-level violence here in cairo, but in several other cities there have been violent confrontations between president morsi's supporters and his opponents. >> pelley: is there any indication that all of this public demonstration is moving morsi to rescind his decree? >> reporter: well, if pr
see up to 15 inches of rain. >>> overseas. egyptian mohamed morsi is expected to sign a new constitution today approved early this morningg by the egyptian assembly. the constitution was approved without input of liberal and. christian lawmakers and gives clerics oversight over legislation and restricts freedom of speech, women's rights and other liberties. >> secretary of state hillary clinton is critical of the overwhelming united nations vote to recognize a palestinian state. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu called it meaningless. the palestinians don't control their borders, airspace or trade but for many of them thursday's vote was a historic victory. vinita nair reports. >> reporter: the u.n. voted in favor of making the palestinians a nonmember observer state. the upgraded status recognizes the borders before israel's captured lands in 1967. >> translator: general assembly is to issue a certificate of the reality of the state of palestine. >> reporter: thousands of palestinians celebrated in the west bank and gaza while in jerusalem israelis protested against
in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> welcome back. stories making news this morning, in egypt, president mohamed morsi is expected to approve a new constitution passed by the assembly as early as saturday. that may mean an end to the protests against morsi's decree giving himself new powers. >>> former president george h.w. bush is expected to leave a houston hospital by the weekend. the 88-year-old was treated for bronchitis and a lingering cough. >>> private bradley manning spoke at a hearing on charges he faces for leaking secrets to wikileaks. he told the military judge he was kept in solitary confinement and only allowed 20 minutes outdoors per day. >>> demominique strauss-kahn ha reached an agreement to settle a civil lawsuit against him by the new york hotel maid she claimed tried to rape her. >>> and the new list of the most popular baby names for 2012 is just out. so top names for the boys, aiden, jackson, ethan, liam and mason. and top names for the girls, all end in the letter "a." sophia, emma, olivia, isabella and ava. and in a surprising twist, the popular book "50 shades of grey"
-fire's holding so far. >> and you thank egypt's president mohamed morsi for that? >> he is so far now proving to be a constructive partner certainly as proven in this last operation. >> is he honoring the peace treaty with israel? >> i think there's peace between egypt and israel on a daily basis, yes. >> what about syria? what would you like to see the government of israel as far as syria is concerned? because it's intense what's going on right now. about 40,000 people have been killed over the past year and a half. >> it's horrible. it's a terrible tragedy. we, the people of israel, look at the people of syria with great respect, even awe standing up and risking and even giving their lives for freedom from the terrible bashar al assad regime. we want them to go. we've long wanted him to depart. he is an ally of iran. he has not only killed 40,000 of his own people, he's tried to make a secret nuclear military program, he's helped in providing tens and tens of thousands of missiles to terrorists in lebanon and gaza. he is a loose cannon. we want him gone. we want to see a democratic and peac
read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been covering it for decades now. when you see israel moving hundreds of troops to the border of israel and gaza and saying it's going to call up 16,000 more reservists, what does that sound like they're preparing for? >> certainly would case that they're preparing for a ground invasion of gaza. in fact, this is very similar to what happened in the 2008, 2009 fight between hamas and israel. israel for the first few days pounded targets around gaza, and then sent in the troops. certainly, i mean, if you listen, for insta
is the role of egypt and mohamed morsi's new government there being interpreted in gaza? what the people there expect egypt to do? >> most gazans sought egypt as standing with gaza. this ought egypt sending the prime minister for a visit to gaza as a real show of solidarity. however, if you look at the policy, it is not really changed at all. there's been an easing since the mubarak era. it is still largely closed to trade with -- to trade. they ignore human rights and justice and equity. they're looking at it from a security issue, which does not make or is not a real break a policy from mubarak's era. i think there is not an insignificant things that morsi has done that has helped to significantly change the tone of the issue of israel and palestine in the middle east, but in terms of actual policy, not much has changed. >> is that because the military is still determining egypt -- the israel-palestine policy and not so much the demonstration of morsi? >> for years, the entire palestine issue was not handled by the egyptian ministry of foreign affairs but by military intelligence. yes,
mohammed morsi will try to explain reasons for giving himself nearly absolute power. he and his backer notice muslim brotherhood argued he needed to do it to speed along the transition to a new government. the move has sparked new rallies which have turned violent at times. [chanting] >> shepard: meantime judges on egypt's highest court who lost their power under this decree today went on strike and say they will not return to work until the president gives up the sweeping powers that he somehow granted himself. palestinian leaders predict they are going to score historic win tomorrow when the united nations votes on whether to recognize a palestinian state. analysts expect the vote to pass and by a big majority it would grant palestine only limited understood -- statehood. against the effort it could give palestinians new leverage against israel. mahmoud abbas has said he will not negotiate with israel as long as it keeps expanding settlements in the west bank. and the israeli prime minister has refused to freeze that construction. "the fox report's" correspondent jonathan hunt is at
throughout the week about what the new president, mohammed morsi has done, a member of the islamic brotherhood, is egypt the next iran that the united states now has to fear? melissa: well it could be. morsi frankly is consolidating power and he is squeezing out the minority, and the minorities are the christians, the liberals and secularists many of whom are in the square right now. the constituent assembly writing this constitution you referred to earlier, the liberals and the secularists and christians have long left to participate in that because they were being frozen out of the process. so it's, it is questionable the value of this document and whether it will accommodate some of the rights and social and political justices that the people in that square are wanting. bill: many people consider morsi to be moving along that line. i mean do you see it yourself? or do you see him holding back from that? melissa: well i think he is probably going to pull back a little bit. i would like to belief the administration and state department is working certainly, you know, off the media
-fire deal brokered largely over the phone. president obama and the president of egypt, mohamed morsi, apparently making a real connection to stop the carnage. i want to begin our coverage here of the very fragile truce with arwa damon live with us this morning in gaza city. arwa, i think i hear horns honking. is the celebration there continuing where you are? >> reporter: it is. although the crowds have tapered off a little bit. but it is pretty incredible when you look at the street down below us and compare it to what the situation was like 24 hours ago, when you would hardly see a single person outside and most of the shops were shut. you can see very close to where people were gathering, celebrating what they're calling a victory. just one of the many locations that were bombed during this most recent conflict. that was, in fact, a residential home. the israelis, when they struck it later on, saying that they believe that it was being used by a senior hamas commander as an intelligence operations center. but people, ever since the cease-fire was announced, were taking to the stre
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
's president mohammed morsi tomorrow. later this week he will travel to israel to meet with prime minister netanyahu and also to the west bank to meet the palestinian president mahmoud abbas. the trouble with these negotiations as so often in these cases is who stops firing first. in the word of u.s. officials that is clearly up to hamas to do. listen. >> we have been very clear that israel has a right of self-defense. we have been very clear that rockets continue to be fired and land on israel. we have been very clear that we are working to try to get this conflict deescalated. we have been very clear about our concern for civilians and innocence on both sides. >> important to note that while diplomacy has not yet succeeded, neither, shep, has it failed. shep? >> shepard: jonathan hunt at the united nations for us. well, it was a huge day on wall street. as stocks soared to the best trading session since the presidential election since nearly two weeks ago. if you have been afraid to peek at your 401(k) it might not be a bad idea now. the dow up 207 points. nasdaq up 63. s&p up to 27. app
with mohamed morsi. she won't meet with hamas which the u.s. government regards as a terrorist organization. netanyahu met last hour with secretary of state ban ki-moon. the two met with reporters only moments ago. >> unfortunately, mr. secretary, hamas and islamic jihad and the other terrorist groups do not share your concern about our civilian casualties or about civilian casualties at all. >> that was the israeli prime minister meeting with the u.s. secretary-general ban ki-moon. earlier today israel put an all-out ground assault of gaza on hold,age i'm quoting, to give limited time for a diplomatic solution. egypt sees an end to the gaza conflict, that's see. president morsi says, the travesty of the israeli aggression on ga did will end in a few hours ap christiane amanpour is here and watching what's going on. the diplomacy is intense right now but it's by no means a done deal. >> it's not a done deal but by all the signals we're getting, it looks like both sides feel they are just about there. obviously, you're not there until the whole thing is done and ready to be announced but the
. >> seemingly unexpected leader was egypt's mohamed morsi, a man we've seen at rallies where egyptians chanted we are hamas. it's an impressive feat and the first time that israel has ever negotiated with an islamist government. but there are some shady things about the deal. according to an israeli newspaper, neither side officially signed penned to paper on the cease-fire agreement which raise sometimes questions about it. and here's what we know is in the verbal deal. israel has agreed to hold its fire and end attacks against top militants and this is important, promise to look at ways to ease its blockade of the gaza border. hamas agreed not to strike any israeli targets and agreed there is no passage of weapons into gaza and to insure other palestinian groups in the gaza strip stop their attacks. if you're shaking your head that some of these things are very tall order, well, you're right. later "outfront" we have the key players, israel's foreign deputy minister and leerd of the plo to the united states. they will be our guests and answer those questions. but cnn's ben wedeman is in gaza
president mohammed morsi stood by his decision to essentially give himself complete control over egypt. he says it's only temporary. you may recall last week he issued several decrees. including an order that all decisions he makes are final. and one that states no legislature and no court can overturny law that he makes. if that sounds like a dictatorship to you, it does to these people, too. they are pro-democracy protesters who have responded to days of clashes that have led to one death and hundreds of injuries. all of this less than two years after a popular uprising ousted hosni mubarak. the white house has not spoken with the ejimtion counter part since his power grab but they are keeping a close eye on the situation. >> we have raised concerns. i think the state department put out a statement on this or new one addressed it in a briefing. i think the state department might have more information for you on, you know, specifically how we have communicated those concerns. but, you know, our interest is in the process, the transition towards democracy. >> shepard: also today secretary
. protesters in egypt staged nationwide rallies today against egyptian president mohamed morsi and his muslim brotherhood. in cairo, more than 100,000 people filled tahrir square to condemn morsi's decree that makes his decisions immune to judicial review. earlier, there were clashes between protesters and police. the rallies were some of the largest since the overthrow of president hosni mubarak last year. in syria, government warplanes bombed towns in the north and east, in the face of new advances by rebel fighters. in one attack, the planes dropped barrels filled with explosives and gasoline just west of idlib city. reports of the dead ranged from five to 20. the regime is using intensive air raids to try to beat back rebel gains. forensic experts took samples from the remains of yasser arafat today, hoping to determine once and for all if the late palestinian leader was poisoned. arafat died in 2004. his body was briefly exhumed today in ramallah, on the west bank. we have a report from john ray of independent television news. >> reporter: eight years after they buried him they sealed ya
, the political crisis took a new turn, as two top appellate courts went on strike against president mohammed morsi. they said they won't return to work until morsi rescinds decrees giving himself near absolute power. at the same time, the supreme constitutional court rejected morsi's claims that it's undermining his government. >> ( translated ): the egyptian supreme constitutional court will not be terrorized from any threat or blackmail and it will not be subjected to any pressure from anyone, no matter how forcible the pressure. and the supreme constitutional court is ready to face this, whatever the consequences, which could be a high price, even if the price is the life of its judges. >> sreenivasan: the courts' actions came a day after nationwide protests against morsi's decrees. and late today, there was word the egyptian leader will address the country tomorrow about his actions and the response. rebels in eastern congo have begun pulling out of territory they seized from government troops just last week. neighboring countries had issued an ultimatum for the m-23 fighters to withdraw
their president, mohammed morsi and the new constitution that just was passed in that country. they're upset about what they consider a massive grab for power by the president. >> unfortunately this decision is against what i was expecting from him completely, and i think it's against the benefit and the good for the people and the country. >> the new constitution went through after hours of haggling, and the draft is set to be presented to the president tomorrow. but it still needs to be approved by the people, and critics of the hasty nature of the vote say that this is an attempt by morsi's party, the muslim brotherhood, to hijack the constitution in that country. president morsi has promised egyptians that his decrees will go into effect just as soon as the new constitution is ratified in a public referendum. >>> not far away but worlds away essentially. this is what syrians are waking up to many mornings, and syrians are waiting for this violence to end. they may be waiting a long time, though. for the last two days they have now been cut off from the outside world completely. there's no inte
me. >>> more protests in egypt. hours before a huge rally against mohamed morsi. many had been camping out for the demonstration against the president who issued several decrees last week that gives him almost absolute power. twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> if you read only one thing this morning, in an effort to keep you all hip on emerging trends, the latest trend in tv entertainment. 20-something virgins. the daily beast points out these story lines are actually reflecting real life. it's up on our facebook page at facebook/jansingco. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to cre
, president mohamed morsi has been very much involved in trying to achieve a cease-fire together with representatives from turkey, from qatar. president and the secretary of state, the u.s. president, they've been talking to all sorts of leaders. let's see what happens. i'm only a few miles north of the gaza border right now. it's eerie here. the cafes are pretty much deserted. i was walking along the mediterranean beach. normally there would be a lot of people, it's a beautiful day here. pretty much deserted. i just got to an israeli area where there's a shelter for school kids. you hear the sirens going off. as soon as i got here a few hours ago the sirens went off. the soldiers rushed everyone into these bomb shelters, into these areas. you could see why people are terrified about what's going on. apparently in this particular inciden incident, when i heard the thuds, when i heard the sirens going off, the iron dome, this anti-missile system, seemed to have worked. we saw huge plumes from what this iron dome system had done. it's bad on both sides. you ask how much longer is i
the new president. tear gas was fired to disperse demonstrators. many say mohamed morsi betrayed the democratic intention of arab spring when he granted himself sweeping new powers last week. we'll keep an eye on cairo and bring you new developments as they happen. >>> as early as today, we could hear from the u.s. soldier accused of leaking thousands of military and diplomatic secrets to wikileaks. bradley manning says military jailers mistreat ed him for nearly a year. if his attorneys can prove that, his case could be dismissed. if not, manning could face life in prison if convicted. >>> also this morning, forensic experts have what they need to determine if former palestinian leader yasser arafat may have been poisoned eight years ago. just hours ago, they exhumed his body, took samples from the remains and then reburied him. fred pleitgen has been following the developments from the west bank. morning, fred. >> reporter: good morning, carol. the process only lasted a few hours. early in the morning hours, the grave, the tomb of yasser arafat was opened, all of this closed of
have had this agreement and then in place for years. once mohammed morsi took over as the president, and he was for the muslim brotherhood, many started to question if you will honor that agreement. it is critical to peace in the middle east. your thoughts now that they are getting involved to some extent? >> first to welcome the peace agreement between israel and egypt is for the mutual interest. i think it is the bedrock of stability in this region. it is important that we really keep that in mind and any move on the egyptian side to try to help out in this situation would be looked upon favorably. but first and foremost responsibility for any government is its citizens. we cannot continue with a situation like that. hamas, in a sense, has turned from the whole region. they are really the enemies of peace and we should really try to work together to make sure that the military infrastructure is weekend to such a manner that we will be able to sit down with moderate palestinians in order to achieve a better understanding and peace. megyn: you have hamas and gaza and iran, sir, than
, that is a very big question mark. president mohammed morsi is the leader of the muslim brotherhood who has very close ties to hamas and to other terror organizations. on the other hand, i do believe that egypt needs some kind of deal. they need to show that it is leading the arab world again and they need to regain the arab world. what we have actually seen today is iran trying to take over the arab and muslim world. we have seen a fight for supremacy in the muslim world between turkey and iran. what we have now is several parties, including the united states, egypt and turkey. very eager to broker a deal that will shoulder their control. the big question is whether anybody can control hamas, which as you said, is a terror organization that is brutal and evil and intent upon killing civilians. i don't think we can trust them. jenna: with all due to your respect and diplomacy, i would like to ask you a diplomatic question. something that we face in the united states as well. peace negotiations being what they are, terrorists continue to grow stronger and have powerful weapons. they continue to d
maccallum. gregg: i'm gregg jarrett in for bill hemmer. hillary clinton met with mohammed morsi, and another meeting with mahmoud abbas, and then with benjamin netanyahu she expressed a commitment to israel. >> america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid and unwaivering, that is why we believe it is essential to de-escalate the situation in gaza. heather: doug mcelway joins us live if the white house. what is the latest with the talks with secretary clinton? >> reporter: no read out yet on the talks ao egyptian president morsi yet. we did get a read out on her talks with mahmoud abbas. no signs of any kind of progress or breakthrough, but just appreciation for the effort. the move towards the cease-fire very much come phra ka*eulted by thcomplicated by a terrorist attack on a bus. the white house condemned the attack in the strongest language. these attacks against israeli civilians are outrageous. the united states will stand with our israeli allies and identify and bring to justice the perpetrators of this attack. that statement very much in line with a number of administration
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